Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics (2020)

6DE015EE-C5F7-48A4-9517-3832AC90D02C

 

Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics, is a 2020  documentary directed by Donick Cary. It features many different types of celebrities talking about experiences taking psychedelic drugs. Some of the stories are funny, some are serious and some a mixture of both. Each story is different from the others and is reenacted by actors, animation, or a combination of both. Nick Offerman is main star of the film, who plays the scientist, explaining who different hallucinogenic drugs affect the mind and body.

The science behind the drugs is the most interesting part of this film. The celebs mostly talk about what it’s like to on particular drugs, a few actually tell stories of being on them. Many of the tales are like being in Wonderland or My Little Pony World and are not interesting, probably unless you have experienced it for yourself as well. Other tales have seriousness combined with humor, like having fun until something bad happens to someone or something or both. Maybe this film would be enjoyable under the influence of a hallucinogenic or alcohol.

 

There are celebrities from actors, musicians, comedians, television show hosts, writers, etc., so you get a variety of different people, many whom you wouldn’t think would ever do drugs. This documentary takes a deep nose dive into a serious subject and the majority of it feels more like a comedy film rather than something to learn from.

Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann and hippie singer Donovan do appear in the movie and talk not just about their experiences on psychedelics but also how drugs shaped the 1960s and 70s. They provide their encounter with more seriousness than the rest of the guests, also providing historical facts with their happenings.

The film does go into a brief segment about the history of psychedelic drugs and another segment talks about Timothy Leary the clinical psychologist that helped form the Harvard Psilocybin Project from 1960-62 and is considered a pioneer in psychedelic drugs research. This is one of the few interesting parts of this movie, because you actually learn, unlike the majority of the famous guests’ stories.

If you want to learn watch a real documentary on drugs, not this where you learn some, but not enough. If you want to know what it’s like to be on hallucinogenic antidotes, than you will likely enjoy this one.  If you already know what it’s like to live in a yellow submarine, you definitely will be entertained. Major documentary fans, may want to steer clear of this one

The drug tales are entertaining but many are too silly to be in a documentary movie, even though they’re factual, you’re not actually learning about what the drugs do to you only what someone has done under the influence of it, although Nick Offerman explains it.

Not the best documentary I’ve ever seen, but definitely not the worst. At times it feels bad to laugh at someone whacked out on an illegal substance where they’re frying their brain cells. You think they’re stupid for doing it, but you end up laughing anyway, which isn’t exactly a good thing, since the substances are an addictive.

Bottom line, you learn some, but not enough from this movie. More science and history is definitely what this film needs to be an excellent one. It feels like a few of the celebrities interviewed are endorsing hallucinatory drug usage. I know the famous people’s stories are the main point of the film, but it needed more facts and history, to be considered a document style film. Adults only. 3/5

1917 (2019)

1917 is a 2019 epic war film directed by Sam Mendes. The film stars George MacKay, Dean-Charles Chapman, Mark Strong, Richard Madden, Colin Firth, Andrew Scott and Benedict Cumberbatch. The film is based in part on a story told to Mendes by his grandfather, Alfred Mendes.

The film tells the story of two young British soldiers during World War I who are given a mission to call off an attack doomed to fail soon after the German head to the Hindenburg Line during Operation Alberich in 1917.

This film’s effects, the cinematography, scenery, costumes and music is outstanding. This movie is hard-hitting, like a punch in the stomach. It starts out rather slow, then gradually picks up, but the majority of this film is action packed. It captures British troops during World War I, with such raw and shocking emotion. Everything about this motion picture is extraordinary. You feel the characters’ emotions. You get scared, nervous, angry and sad.

George MacKay is fantastic as Lance Corporal William Schofield. Dean Charles Chapman is great as Lance Corporal Tom Blake, though his character is short lived. Mark Strong does a fine job as Captain Smith, Andrew Scott is good as Lieutenant Leslie and Richard Madden is also good as Lieutenant Joseph Blake, though his part is brief.

Whether this film is really based on a true story or not, it is still magnificent. Even if the film is only partly factual or not true at all, it is still a realistic look at British soldiers during the First World War. It shows the extreme violence, the killing, the shooting and bombing, the deaths, the life of the troops. You gain knowledge of how it was during that time in history. This film portrays the horrors of the war perfectly.

True or not and at exactly two hours long, this is a very important war film, next to others like Schindler’s List and All Quiet on the Western Front. It is one that should be watched on the big screen, to get the full effect and take in every emotion. This gripping movie is not one to be missed. It isn’t the happiest film, but it isn’t the saddest either, it has its depressing moments and happier ones too. The ending could have been different in my opinion, instead of just Schofield looking at picture, the end, but that is really all I’d change, everything else is perfect. Powerful and moving. 18+ 4.5/5