Top Feminist Films Part 2

60. Faces – 1968

61. A Smiling Madame Beudet – 1923

62. 3 Women – 1977

63. Drowning by Numbers – 1988

64. Street of Shame – 1956

65. Women Without Men – 2009

66. Entre Nous – 1983

67. The House of Sand – 2005

68. Sweetie – 1989

69. Girls Town – 1996

70. The Children’s Hour – 1961

71. Ukraine is Not a Brothel – 2013

72. Bhutto – 2010

73. Kadosh – 1999

74. Klute – 1971

75. Real Women Have Curves – 2002

76. Lovely & Amazing – 2001

77. A Taste of Honey – 1961

78. He Named Me Malala – 2015

79. It’s a Girl! – 2012

80. Medea – 1988

81. After Tiller – 2013

82. Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle – 1994

83. A Case of Rape – 1972

84. Girl Rising – 2013

85. The Apple – 1998

86. When We Leave – 2010

87. Everlasting Moments – 2008

88. Stella Dallas – 1937

89. Camille – 1936

90. Tangerine – 2015

91. The Sleeping Voice – 2011

92. The Invisible War – 2012

93. She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry – 2014

94. RBG – 2018

95. Adam’s Rib – 1949

96. Harper Valley PTA – 1978

97. The Burning Bed – 1984

98. Working Girls – 1986

99. The Watermelon Woman – 1996

100. Offside – 2006

Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics (2020)

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Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics, is a 2020  documentary directed by Donick Cary. It features many different types of celebrities talking about experiences taking psychedelic drugs. Some of the stories are funny, some are serious and some a mixture of both. Each story is different from the others and is reenacted by actors, animation, or a combination of both. Nick Offerman is main star of the film, who plays the scientist, explaining who different hallucinogenic drugs affect the mind and body.

The science behind the drugs is the most interesting part of this film. The celebs mostly talk about what it’s like to on particular drugs, a few actually tell stories of being on them. Many of the tales are like being in Wonderland or My Little Pony World and are not interesting, probably unless you have experienced it for yourself as well. Other tales have seriousness combined with humor, like having fun until something bad happens to someone or something or both. Maybe this film would be enjoyable under the influence of a hallucinogenic or alcohol.

 

There are celebrities from actors, musicians, comedians, television show hosts, writers, etc., so you get a variety of different people, many whom you wouldn’t think would ever do drugs. This documentary takes a deep nose dive into a serious subject and the majority of it feels more like a comedy film rather than something to learn from.

Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann and hippie singer Donovan do appear in the movie and talk not just about their experiences on psychedelics but also how drugs shaped the 1960s and 70s. They provide their encounter with more seriousness than the rest of the guests, also providing historical facts with their happenings.

The film does go into a brief segment about the history of psychedelic drugs and another segment talks about Timothy Leary the clinical psychologist that helped form the Harvard Psilocybin Project from 1960-62 and is considered a pioneer in psychedelic drugs research. This is one of the few interesting parts of this movie, because you actually learn, unlike the majority of the famous guests’ stories.

If you want to learn watch a real documentary on drugs, not this where you learn some, but not enough. If you want to know what it’s like to be on hallucinogenic antidotes, than you will likely enjoy this one.  If you already know what it’s like to live in a yellow submarine, you definitely will be entertained. Major documentary fans, may want to steer clear of this one

The drug tales are entertaining but many are too silly to be in a documentary movie, even though they’re factual, you’re not actually learning about what the drugs do to you only what someone has done under the influence of it, although Nick Offerman explains it.

Not the best documentary I’ve ever seen, but definitely not the worst. At times it feels bad to laugh at someone whacked out on an illegal substance where they’re frying their brain cells. You think they’re stupid for doing it, but you end up laughing anyway, which isn’t exactly a good thing, since the substances are an addictive.

Bottom line, you learn some, but not enough from this movie. More science and history is definitely what this film needs to be an excellent one. It feels like a few of the celebrities interviewed are endorsing hallucinatory drug usage. I know the famous people’s stories are the main point of the film, but it needed more facts and history, to be considered a document style film. Adults only. 3/5