The Kid is a 1921 American silent comedy-drama film written, produced, directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin and co-stars Jackie Coogan. Them film follows the story of Chaplin’s The Little Tramp character who finds an abandoned baby and raises him to boyhood, until authorities try to take him back to his mother.

Very much unhappy, an unwed mother abandons her baby, putting him in an expensive automobile with a handwritten note: “Please take love and care for this orphan child.” Two thieves steal the car and leave the baby in an alley, where he is found by The Tramp. After attempting to to hand off the boy on different people passing by, he finds the note and it melts his heart. He takes the boy home, names him John and rearranges his furniture for him. The mother ends up having a change of heart and goes back for her child, but she learns that the car has been stolen, she faints.

Five years go by. The Kid and the Tramp live in the same quaint room; they have little money but lots of love. They support each other in a little scheme: the Kid throws stones to break windows so that the Tramp, wotking as a glazier, can be paid to repair them. Meanwhile, the mother has become a rich actress and does charity by giving gifts to poor children. By chance, as she is doing so, the mother and the Kid not knowing so, cross paths.

The Kid later gets into a fight with another local boy as people watch the debacle. The Kid wins, making the other boy’s older brother mad, who attacks the Tramp as a result. The mother breaks up the fight, but it starts over once she leaves and the Tramp keeps beating the older brother over the head with a brick tied between strings until he scurries off. Shortly after, the mother coaxes the Tramp to call the doctor after Kid gets sick. The doctor finds out the Kid is not the Tramp’s real son and notifies authorities. Two men come to take the boy to an orphanage, but after a fight and chase, the Tramp and the Kid stay by each others’ sides. When the mother comes back to see how the boy is doing she comes runs into the doctor, who shows her the note (which he had stolen from the Tramp); she recognizes it as the one she left with her baby years ago.

This film is filled with humor and love and teaches about how to over come being poor, falling in love and helping others. Although this film is from the 1920’s, it is still just as effective and touching today, making you cry and warming your heart, as well as making you appreciate what and who you have in your own life. Although the Tramp isn’t the best parent to the Kid, he knows in his heart that he would never ever give him up like his mother did. He tries his very best to give the boy a decent life and the boy is overly grateful.

Charlie Chaplin, who is truly one of the greatest actors and filmmakers of all time, puts so much love, humor and heart into everything he did. In this film, you can feel his love for the boy and can feel his heartbreak when the boy is being taken away, because you actually see Charlie cry and if you look close enough you’ll notice his makeup is streaked. Not many movies today make you feel every emotion the characters feel. This is a true classic and masterpiece that everyone should watch at least once in their life.

There is not much adult stuff in this film. There is nothing sexual, just kisses between the Tramp and the Kid. There is one use of the word “ass” and a middle finger used by a kid but it’s not used as flipping off and seen briefly. The Tramp smokes some, but it was a very common thing then. Slapstick humor is throughout. Also some very emotional scenes, but other than all this, it is great for kids and adults alike. A very powerful, heartfelt film, so funny, yet sweet and yet heartbreaking at times too. A truly wonderful work of art that will bring out every emotion every time. 5+ 5/5

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s